Category Archives: Crafting for Charity

Picture tutorial on Decolourant plus T-shirt sponge prints – Pudsey Bear

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Picture tutorial on Decolourant plus T-shirt sponge prints – Pudsey Bear

As it’s Children in need day tomorrow I thought I’d show you how I created a print onto a child’s t-shirt for ‘show your spots day’ at my sons school to raise money.

You can apply this technique to any design of course. This tutorial will be useful to you if you’ve had trouble getting fabric pens or paint to apply neatly and without the t-shirt fabric moving around on you! I’ve included some step-by-step pictures to help.

Materials needed

  • A design you wish to apply to the T-shirt printed onto copy paper (Design used in this project is a free colouring page here)
  • Large piece of card (Large cereal box will do)
  • Repositional spray adhesive
  • Fabric Pens (I used Dylon Broad Nib in Black)
  • Fabric Paint/Dye ink (I used decolourant plus)
  • Iron
  • Hairdryer (if you don’t want to wait for it to dry)
  • T-shirt (I used plain white but use any colour suitable for your paint and pens)
  • Circle foam sponge

Step 1

Spray repositional adhesive to both sides of card and design paper. Position both of these in between the layers of your t-shirt so you can see the design clearly. This may be more difficult with darker fabrics. Smooth out as pictured on both sides of the shirt. Take time to make sure all parts of your design are stuck to the shirt. As this is key to getting a neat finish.

Step 2

Use your fabric pens to complete the design.

Step 3

Once you’ve finished tracing your design. Double check you haven’t missed any areas.

Step 4

To fix the design follow the steps given to you on your chosen pen. For mine I simply had to iron to fix the design. Leave the cardboard in place to stop bleed-through of the paint

Sponge shape cut out from leftover foam from a chair seat project.

Step 5

To achieve this particular design, use a round ended sponge. You can cut one out of dense foam. Dab the sponge shape into the paint a few times to get an even coverage. Don’t over load as this with cause the bleeding of the shape. As this is a circle I was able to a give slight twist to the application and it gave me a nice smooth finish to the edge. You may want to practice this on some spare, similar type fabric first.
Apply one colour at a time front and back, using the hairdryer to dry out each set of spots before turning your t-shirt over. You’ll know when Decolourant is dry as it goes slightly rough like paint texture. (Note: once washed, the texture will be washed out and will be left with a non textured, dyed finish, unlike a typical fabric paint)

Step 6

Decolourant plus requires ironing to fix the dye/paint. Wash your clothing according to guidelines on the clothing and for the paint used.

WahLaa! Your finished, it really didn’t take that long huh?!

Use these t-shirts to help raise money for Children in need.

I hope you found this useful, Thanks for checking out my blog.

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My Mission – Minnie Mouse Cake Pops – Birthday Gift

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Not as easy as they look!

Cute and tasty!

I made it my mission to make some Minnie mouse cake pops. However, I didn’t anticipate this to be as frustrating as it was. With the overall waiting for the cake to cook, fair enough, but there was soooo much waiting for things to cool, set or cook. I was getting rather tired of doing them.

I followed instructions from another website that sounded like they had it in the bag. I started out with 20 cake pops. After lots of hassle with them staying on the stick I went through several techniques in coating these little babies in chocolate. I knew I couldn’t just dunk and pull it out all fresh-as-you-like. Cause the weight of the chocolate would rip the cake ball apart and stay put in your nice bowl of melted chocolate.

In the end the best technique I found was to use a heat proof silicone pastry brush and slowly coat the balls supporting the ball underneath with your hand so it didn’t shift down the stick. Place on its head on grease proof paper and don’t move it until it’s set. You won’t need to refrigerate for it to set. Plus it attracts condensation if you do.

Once I had a thin layer on and it had set and could be peeled from the paper. I was able to coat allot easier due to the chocolate acting like glue and it (mostly) stayed put. Your next layer of chocolate should include placing the ears on. I used chocolate buttons. Don’t bother trimming the side off like some websites tell you. This only inhibits the attaching part, which frankly is quite important! =D Push the ears in after the second coat of chocolate, as this will soften the previous layer just enough to help with that. Otherwise they just break up! These are then to be stood up on their sticks to set, a block of Styrofoam is useful here. A useful tip I did pick up is to make use of a cocktail stick. Just to pick define areas like the ears and to move the chocolate and to remove any excess. I coated mine until I was happy with them. Or at least, not so disappointed!

You only need to make them around 1 inch diameter at first, as the chocolate layers bulk them out. I was worried I wouldn’t get them inside the cellophane bags I had that were 3.5″x5″ I bought from Ebay. I chose 4.5″ lolly sticks or the plastic variety, if they don’t come with, you will need some plastic coated wires too to seal them. On my travels around my local town of Cannock, I picked up some lovely ribbon the I thought was just right, at 20p a meter I wasn’t complaining!

I just cut the ribbon a few inches long and tied once tightly. You could, with thinner ribbon tie a bow. But at this point in the baking and making process, I was ready to give up altogether. In the end, I managed to salvage 11 decent looking Minnie silhouettes. They didn’t taste bad at all either. My 2.5yr old son was happy to eat any disaster pops. Although to be fair they were very rich, so don’t worry if you don’t make a lot. I probably wouldn’t eat more than one at a time.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Overall, I’m happy I gave it a go, but I won’t be in a hurry to try this again. Maybe plain round ones with decoration on top to disguise the dodgy coating of chocolate. Let me know if you have tried this and how it worked out.

Mother Bear Project – Knitted Bear – Charity

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On its way!

yippee.. one down!

I finally got around to finishing this bear. I’m super happy with it, and glad it has been posted out today. My son adored it and tried to cuddle it while I was still knitting! That just made me think of how I just had to get it finished in time for this weekends post. So it can be safely delivered into a child’s arms.

This is the first ‘Mother Bear Project’ Bear I’ve completed, but it’s not the last. I will knit a ‘boy’ bear next, I think. Any suggestions on the outfit would be fab!

Knitting for Charity – Squares for Children’s Blankets and Other Little Projects

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Want to Knit-a-square?

Use up Odd Balls of Yarn

I stumbled across this organization Knit-a-square. With our help they provide warm blankets and clothing for sick children in South Africa.

There are lots of patterns to choose from too, such as hats, vests, jumpers and pull overs. If you are very creative you can share your own pattern too.

You don’t need to know how to knit to contribute to this project. If you have any old wool clothing or find any in the charity shops, you can felt them and cut the 8×8″ squares out of the felted fabric. Just by washing and using a dryer you can felt a knitted garment. This mats the fibres so when you cut the fabric it won’t fray or unravel.

It doesn’t matter what type of yarn you have. But take a look at their advice on what to use if you want to contribute to a heart warming cause.

Let me know if you have contributed already. If you have any pictures to share of your donations I would be happy to add them to this blog post!

Happy Knitting.

Angel Bear – Knit bears for UK Children – Charity

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‘…because we care’

Unfortunately, it appears this charity no longer exists. Please check official sources before thinking of contributing.
Angelbear is a non-profit organisation which is the notion that all children in a vulnerable position should own a teddy bear.

The lovely lady who runs this heart-felt project is very helpful when you ask about the bear and it’s pattern. If you need any help, she has a tutorial page that shows you all the basic stitches you need to complete the bear. But rest assured this is a suitable pattern for a beginner and knits up pretty quick.

I felt that I MUST make a teddy bear to contribute to this goal. She’s provides a pattern in which each bear should be based on. But if you have the ability you can change the pattern textures to any you like. This sort of thing really appeals to me so I took it upon myself to create a teddy bear with lots of pattern and texture. I wrote this pattern down. You can find it here. Feel free to use this pattern for non-profit and is suitable for this project too.

Visit the Angelbear website for more information on how to get involved.

All you need is some double knitting yarn in a couple of colours where possible and a pair of 4mm needles, a darning needle and polyester toy stuffing. Non of these items are all that expensive and most crafters will have most if not all of these items already. Just make sure they are new or freshly laundered

An ideal way to use up any leftover yarns you have and put a smile on a child’s face, which is worth more than anything!

My bear is already in the post. I urge you to get knitting too.

Angelbear Knitting Pattern – free for non-profit

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Free Knitting Pattern for www.angelbear.org.uk

Front

The yarn coding refers to the colours I have used so that you can refer to the picture as a helpful guide. If you notice any problems with this pattern please contact me so I can rectify it.
Yarn A= White
Yarn B= Lilac
Yarn C= Green
Yarn D= Pink

HEAD
Yarn A
C/o 18 sts
Row 1= Knit
Row 2= Purl
Row 3= Knit
Row 4= Purl
Row 5= Knit
Row 6= Purl
Row 7= Knit
Row 8= P3, K3, P6, K3, P3
Row 9= K2, P5, K4, P5, K2
Row10= repeat row 9
Row11= repeat row 9
Row12= repeat row 8
Row13= knit and every odd row until and including row 19
Row14= Purl and every even row until and including row 20

Mother Bear Project – Knit a Bear for Charity

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‘Make a bear. Make a difference’

Mother Bear Project

The Mother Bear Project is a non-profit organisation intent on bringing hope and comfort to children, primarily affected by HIV/Aids all over the world. Many will be orphans. These children will be in need of love and comfort and will receive a hand knitted or crocheted bear. Click here to see pictures.

This simple act of giving a teddy bear to a child who has nothing else in the world is truly heart-warming and sends them a message that they are cared for, and that they do matter. I have recently requested a pattern from this wonderful project and can’t wait to start. I urge you to do the same. Please visit the website for more details.

All bears are created from the same pattern. Each pattern you order includes a tag for you to sign and attach to your bear before sending. Once they receive your bear they will sew on a red felt heart before shipping it out to a needy child.

I’ll be posting my contribution as soon as it is made so please subscribe to this blog to receive updates!

Even if you can’t knit or crochet. You can give by sending supplies or donating time or money to this organisation.

To date, 49,650 bears have been sent to children affected by HIV/AIDS through their help!