Tag Archives: tutorial

Picture tutorial on Decolourant plus T-shirt sponge prints – Pudsey Bear

Standard
Picture tutorial on Decolourant plus T-shirt sponge prints – Pudsey Bear

As it’s Children in need day tomorrow I thought I’d show you how I created a print onto a child’s t-shirt for ‘show your spots day’ at my sons school to raise money.

You can apply this technique to any design of course. This tutorial will be useful to you if you’ve had trouble getting fabric pens or paint to apply neatly and without the t-shirt fabric moving around on you! I’ve included some step-by-step pictures to help.

Materials needed

  • A design you wish to apply to the T-shirt printed onto copy paper (Design used in this project is a free colouring page here)
  • Large piece of card (Large cereal box will do)
  • Repositional spray adhesive
  • Fabric Pens (I used Dylon Broad Nib in Black)
  • Fabric Paint/Dye ink (I used decolourant plus)
  • Iron
  • Hairdryer (if you don’t want to wait for it to dry)
  • T-shirt (I used plain white but use any colour suitable for your paint and pens)
  • Circle foam sponge

Step 1

Spray repositional adhesive to both sides of card and design paper. Position both of these in between the layers of your t-shirt so you can see the design clearly. This may be more difficult with darker fabrics. Smooth out as pictured on both sides of the shirt. Take time to make sure all parts of your design are stuck to the shirt. As this is key to getting a neat finish.

Step 2

Use your fabric pens to complete the design.

Step 3

Once you’ve finished tracing your design. Double check you haven’t missed any areas.

Step 4

To fix the design follow the steps given to you on your chosen pen. For mine I simply had to iron to fix the design. Leave the cardboard in place to stop bleed-through of the paint

Sponge shape cut out from leftover foam from a chair seat project.

Step 5

To achieve this particular design, use a round ended sponge. You can cut one out of dense foam. Dab the sponge shape into the paint a few times to get an even coverage. Don’t over load as this with cause the bleeding of the shape. As this is a circle I was able to a give slight twist to the application and it gave me a nice smooth finish to the edge. You may want to practice this on some spare, similar type fabric first.
Apply one colour at a time front and back, using the hairdryer to dry out each set of spots before turning your t-shirt over. You’ll know when Decolourant is dry as it goes slightly rough like paint texture. (Note: once washed, the texture will be washed out and will be left with a non textured, dyed finish, unlike a typical fabric paint)

Step 6

Decolourant plus requires ironing to fix the dye/paint. Wash your clothing according to guidelines on the clothing and for the paint used.

WahLaa! Your finished, it really didn’t take that long huh?!

Use these t-shirts to help raise money for Children in need.

I hope you found this useful, Thanks for checking out my blog.

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Knitted Cowl / Buttoned Scarf – How to – using super chunky wool

Standard

Knitted Gifts Fast

Fast knits!

This super chunky knitted scarf took less than a day start to finish. Including figuring the style and making the buttons. The pattern was one I thought of that would work best for this project.

You can use any alternatives but these are what I used and would bode best for this pattern. Plus the quality of the yarn speaks volumes on this project. Ideal as a winter time gift.

Dimensions 7.5″ x 28″

What you need
1 x ball of  Sirdar Denim Ultra Wool (super chunky)
8mm Knitting Needles
3 x 15-18mm Odd but similar sized buttons with preferably 4 sewing holes.
Small piece of colour coordinating Wool Felt to cover buttons
Needle and thread

Directions
Using the 8mm knitting needles
Cast on 18 sts

(Rib pattern row)
[Row 1 -K2, P2 until last 2 stitches, K2]
[Row 2 -P2, K2 until last 2 stitches, P2]
knit Row 2 of rib pattern
knit Row 1 of rib pattern

(Body of scarf)
(right side row)Knit row
Purl row
P2, K14, P2
K2, P14, K2

Continue scarf body pattern until you reach 26″ ending on a wrong side

Knit Row 2 of rib pattern
Knit Row 1 of rib pattern
Knit Row 1 of rib pattern
Knit Row 2 of rib pattern

Cast off and tie in any ends not weaved in.

How it's fastened

The buttons were made using a simple technique. With leftover yarn from the scarf. There should be more than enough if you have good tension.

Cut 3 lengths of yarn at around 8″
3 x 2″ diameter felt circles, or big enough to cover the buttons as pictured.

Tie knots in the centre to make a bobble. Split the yarn so you have 4 tails (see picture below) and thread each through the 4 eyes of the button.

Using small stitches, make a running stitch around circles of felt. Do not knot yet.

Pull slightly on the thread so that it creates a slight dome shape. Place in the prepared knotted wool and button. Pull the thread and make sure the thread covers the back of the button centrally. Tie off the thread after sewing over the felt and yarn to secure the back, as these will be pulled at when used.

Using the picture to help you with placement, use the tails of the buttons to tie onto the rib of the scarf. Making sure they line up with the natural holes created by your stitches.

The three stages of covering the buttons

Threading Technique

Finishing the button

Mickey Mouse Clubhouse Theme Birthday Cake – How to

Standard

Mickey is number one!

Mickey Cake

For my son’s first birthday (last year) I baked him a Mickey Mouse theme cake. I used 9″ and 6″ cake tins to do this 2 tier cake.

I baked the cake base using this recipe or you could choose your own. You only need 1 and half times the recipe. One for the bottom and half is for the top. I halved my tiers and layered butter cream in the centre. You wouldn’t need to do this. But you will need to make a batch of butter cream to ‘stick’ the fondant to the cake.

To get the top cake, not to sink into the other cake while it’s on top, cause that just wouldn’t be pretty! Use 3 or 4 cut down straws or wooden skewers to the height of the fondant layer. Rest your cake on its own 6″ base or if using a different size tins it should measure the same as your cake so you can’t see it. It will be easier to remove it after for cutting that way. The bottom layer should probably have one at least an inch larger base than the bottom layer cake.

Ok, so you’ve baked your cake and let it cool, added butter cream to the outside and you’ve rolled out the fondant and placed it neatly over the top. Once it’s all smooth and square with the cake, you’ll want to start decorating. I only used supermarket fondant that is fairly cheap, but tasty. With the white you can also dye it any colour you like using gel colours. For mine I’m sure I used Ruby Red, Violet, and Christmas green and licorice black. Of course with any dying process you will have to add a bit at a time to get the colour you want.

The best technique I’ve found for blending the colour the best is by making a well in the white fondant ball and using a cocktail stick to control how much I put in. Place in a small amount and close the well up so the dye is inside. This will help stop the majority of the dye getting straight all over your hands. Cause it doesn’t come off your hands easily. Now roll, just using your hands, the ball into a sausage shape. You want it to be long enough to turn back on itself. Now just rinse and repeat until it is all blended. This method will help stop it sticking all on your hands too. If you add too much dye, try adding icing sugar powder to soak up the extra moisture. Now let the coloured icing sit aside and cool down. You could now dye another batch and so on. Once you have all the colours you want, return to the first colour as it should have cooled enough. Don’t leave it a long time or it will start to dry out. If you plan to use it later that day you can wrap it in cling film to stop it from drying up.

I used letter fondant cutter for his name. The Mickey heads were about 1.5″ in diameter. If you don’t have a tiny cutter for his ears (assuming you don’t just have a mickey mouse cutter) you can roll a small piece into a ball and press into shape straight onto the cake. You may want to test your sizing before going straight to the cake and make all your ear balls before applying them so they are uniform in size.

A way to get your fondant shapes to stick is to use an edible glue or make your own by using good spoon full of icing sugar and add drops of water until a glue consistency. Remember though, it takes more sugar to water to fix it if you put too much water in. So do it gradually.

You can finish of (or hide any messy edges) by using ribbon around the bottom of each layer. Hold in place with a tiny piece of clear tape or like I did using butter cream as a glue.

You should end up with an awesome, but more importantly, handmade cake! Enjoy giving and eating together! Hope you found this guide useful. Let me know if you try this! I love to share others photos too. Post a comment to contact me.